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A German test

 

P8

As a rider sees it.  The handlebar is split.
Not only technically well executed but a beautiful vehicle.

Probably the new air intake system which gets its air from a space under the seat would run a little better still because in the last model in the fourth gear the bike could be ridden as low as 30k/h without jerking and from that speed easily accelerate.

If you tell people about the means that could be achieved with the Adler MB250, they make troubled glances skywards to see whether the roof is bending under the weight of your exaggeration.

But with the exceedingly good acceleration values and the exemplary gear ratios comes also handling and maneouverability which makes the quick bird from Frankfurt almost unbeatable, particularly in curves, or in heavy traffic, or on badly made side streets.

Nothing characterises the riding experience of this machine better than the remark that you can put even the most basic beginner on this high capability machine without compunction and my 13 year old boy, not particularly strong, after long hours of riding field tracks without traffic and on sloping meadows gets no more tired than with a 125.

I'm not in principle an unconditional fan of a low centre of gravity.  Even without a rider on the MB250 it lies at about 380mm and with a rider at about 470mm from the ground.  I am also not necessarily a fan of a short wheelbase, which in the meantime has been increased from 1225 to 1260mm.  Even with somewhat diminished handling I like somewhat higher inertial moment around the long and high axes.  For that reason I went at the test of the MB250 with the same critical position expressed by many larger riders at first sight of the stocky-seeming machine.

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