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A German test

 

P3/P4

Peter Peregrin tests the Adler MB 250

 

Since the first Scott sang its jubilant song under me, I have had a quiet love for the two-cylinder twin.  Wherever I could later lay my hands on one of the wild bees from Graz or Zschopau, from the house of Ravin or the rare 350 Villiers, the ride would become a roaring experience.  It left indelible traces on the sketch-plan from the sheets of which one day the dream-machine should be composed.

In a quarter of a century, many an ideal changes.  The untroubled pleasure of the young engineer, who believes in progress, is painfully purified through the continuously finer sieve of experience.

However, when Director Hermann Friedrich, some five years ago, showed me the first drawings of the M 200, I had a presentiment that the satisfaction of a long-standing wish was close at hand --- after over 6000 km of the hardest and changing trials of the bigger sister, I can  thankfully confirm it.  This Adler M 250, which rose like a glowing comet on the horizon of the motorcycle rider, must, in its current form, excite even the most exacting and can even given an old rabbit palpitations.  Please do not laugh, because I grant it a very human quality: 

THIS MACHINE SIMPLY HAS CHARM.

The new Adler MB250, as it was first exhibited at the IFMA 1953.
The most obvious changes are the front fork and a bigger tank.
The machine was built with love and skill, impressing time and time
again with its construction and clean assembly.
 

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